Creating the governance framework for the use of Social Media tools in your school

This blog is 8 of 19 in a series on how to implement an Enterprise 2.0 framework for schools.

1. INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this blog is to discuss Social Media Governance i.e. strategically managing Social Media use within your school. This blog begins by discussing the elements of Governance. I then briefly discuss forming a Social Media Governance body in your school. This blog finishes by introducing two YouTube Videos, that contains a 16 minute discussion on Social Media Governance, and a website that contains more than 150 social media policies.

2. Governance

Figure 1.0 – Elements of Governance for Social Media

As Figure 1.0 suggests the elements of governance include: cost, change, alignment, service, compliance to policy, and quality. These elements ultimately become the KPI’s for your Governance Board.

2.1 Forming a Governance Board

If you are like my school you probably already have an Information Technology (IT)committee who acts as the governance board for all things IT. If not it actually is a good idea to form this committee. I usually loathe having to sit through education committee meetings, however if you can get your school to the bleeding edge of technology use, good philosphical and challanging committee meetings can be had. Ensure that you have key leadership team members on the committee, as well as key technology and leading teachers on this committee.

2.2 Managing Social Media at your school

See the following two videos, on social media governance. Some interesting listening on Social Media Governance.

If you are interested in setting policies you can not go past the following website.

http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php

This video has briefly discussed the elements of Social Media Governance, and provided some resources for developing a Governance strategy for your organisation

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Social Media – Return on Engagement

The purpose of this blog is to discuss ways to measure Return on Investment (ROI) for Social Media implementation.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

Determining and measuring ROI for Social Media is not an easy undertaking. As Figure 1.0 below explains the Cause and Effect Chain for Social Media variables is often long. Another way of saying this is that the measurable variables for Social Media are usually confounded, and it is not until all of these variables are realised that ROI can be realised.

Not all ROI, therefore, can be measured directly in terms of monetary value. In some cases Return on Engagement (ROE) is used rather than ROI.  Usually this is the more valid measure for schools. There are two reasons for this. The first is that schools have a relatively high percentage of fixed costs as part of their overall operating costs. The variable costs are relatively small, so justification is usually based on the need rather than money. The second reason ROE is more relevant, is that the question usually asked by Teachers and Administrators when implementing a new IT product is “How much time is needed to implement this product, and how will this benefit the teaching and learning process?” This blog, therefore, focuses on the ROE measure rather than ROI.

2. CASE STUDY

The following Case Study comes from St Hilda’s College – Gold Coast . Geoff Powell (Director of Learning) was kind enough to share this information with me.

Recently St. Hilda’s College implemented a Blackboard, iPAD implementation. A screen shot of this application is below. As the screen shot below suggests, Social Media implementation, was only part of the overall implementation strategy for increasing engagement with students. Some lessons can be learnt here if you are an 2.0 consultant. As will be highlighted later, Social Media implementation can more successful if part of a wider strategy or implementation. In this case, a Learning Management System, and Mobile Learning Tools (iPADs).

Figure 2.0 – Screen Shot of the Blackboard application at St Hilda’s College – Gold Coast

2.1 Measures

St Hilda’s College, uses a Gateway device called Netbox Blue. I have implemented this device within my own college. Netbox allows your school network administrator to develop reports on traffic to all pages within your intranet. The following screen shots come from the netbox device.

It should be noted that these figures do not show that the increase in student engagement  is a result of social media implementation alone. Social Media tools are embedded within the LMS, and therefore Social Media is only a contributor to the increase in engagement that are shown in these figures. Seven sets of data are provided. Each of these graphs show how students have increased their engagement with the subject matter, and a result of this implementation.

Figure 3 – shows the increases in visits to St Hilda’s intranet, through making the internet connection faster alone.

Figure 4 – Page visits to the LMS per day.

Figure 5 – shows the number of page views during the busiest days. Pre and Post implementation traffic is tabled.

Figure 6 – Number of page view increases during school holidays pre and post implementation.

Figure 7 – Number of views in Year 10 English 2010

Figure 8 – Number of views in Year 10 English 2011. A tenfold increase in volume of traffic.

Figure 9 – Year 10 English, 2010 – 2011 direct comparisons

3. CONCLUSION

This blog has provided insight on how data can be collected to measure increases in student engagement. Although the dependent variable in this Case Study is not Social Media alone, Social Media forms part of a larger strategy that leads to increases in Student Engagement. Netbox or similar devices could be used to measure traffic volume and time spent on pages that contain social media. Ultimately this is a good measure of engagement.

If you would like to make a comment on this article please feel free to do so.

Posted in Blogs, Communication, Enterprise 2.0 | 1 Comment

Building a Business Case for Web 2.0 implementation at your school

This blog is 11 of 19 in a series on how to implement an Enterprise 2.0 framework for schools.

1. INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this blog is to provide a framework that will assist the School Enterprise Consultant in developing a Business Case, for Social Media use, in their school. There are many websites that provide example templates for building a business case. Essentially, however, there are three main parts to a business case. The first part requires a description of the organisation in its current state i.e. What are the organisation’s business needs. What are the desired outcomes for the future of the business / project? This section should also briefly describe, how a potential solution has a strategic fit. It should also briefly describe the scope of this solution. The second part of the business case presents a ‘viability option analysis’. What are the viable options that can fulfill this business need. A cost benefit analysis should be provided for these business solutions. The final part of a business case will address the implementation considerations of the solution e.g. the capacity of the organisation to change, timelines, scope, impact and risk.

The scope of this blog is to help the enterprise consultant build the business case by providing a basic understanding of how to model and position the current ‘as is state’ of schools. I also provide a template, to build a ‘viability option analysis’. This blog does not address the third part of building a business case; implementation considerations.

This blog starts by outlining an example school vision statement. Social Media should be a tool to support the outcomes associated with the school vision. Clear statements that show how social media use supports the school vision, characterises a strong business case. The  second part of this blog states the key services that are delivered by a school to a student. This blog will provide a framework that shows how social media enhances these services thereby facilitating the outcomes of the school vision. This should forms the basis of a business case for social media use in your school.

2. SCHOOL VISION

An example school vision is as follows;

“Inspired by our values and beliefs, our students will engage in a dynamic and relevant curriculum, rich in diversity. It will focus on delivering experiences that cater for and extend the range of learning styles where students are challenged to attain standards
that empower them to reach their potential. A whole school approach will promote the development of all dimensions of the individual giving him the opportunity to be a lifelong learner, a creative and critical thinker and a discerning participant in the world, now and in the future”.

Ultimately any business case should show how web 2.0 tools will be able to support this vision.

3. BUSINESS STRUCTURE OF SCHOOLS

There are a number of different ways in which a school can be modelled as a business. For the purposes of this blog I will use a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) model i.e. what are the key services that are delivered to a student throughout their enrolment at the college. From this perspective the key business drivers are, and correspond to those key services. Figure 1.0 displays the key services that are delivered to a student throughout their enrolment.


Figure 1.0 – Key Services / Business drivers of a school.

The first service experienced by the student is the ‘Enrolment Process’. Once the student has been enrolled, they are prepared access to a number of services within the college. The student chooses their subjects and their timetable is consequently developed. For each subject at the college, course structure, course content, and the course delivery mechanisms are developed. In alignment with the student’s academic development,
pastoral care and student support services are an integral part of the student’s personal development. All students will complete subject based assessment as well as central examinations. Finally student records and statutory reporting are prepared on behalf of the student.

4. MAPPING SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLS AGAINST EACH OF THE SCHOOL SERVICES.

The following table demonstrates how Web 2.0 technologies can be used in your school to enhance the services delivered to the students. The following table is just an example
framework to help facilitate the development of your business case. You may have more ideas than what is listed in this blog.

Table 1.0 – Social Tools Mapping viz Services – 1

Table 2.0 – Social Tools Mapping viz Services – 2

Table 3.0 – Social Tools Mapping viz Services – 3

This section has provided a basic framework, to aid the Enterprise 2.0 Consultant in developing the first two parts of a business case. Once these two parts have been documented  you will also need to develop budgets, and an implementation plan. The budgets and implementation plan will obviously be dependent on the scope of your newly defined scope of works. This will complete the third part of your business case.

This concludes this blog on developing a business case for social media use within your school. Should you wish to make any comments on this blog, please feel free to do so.

Posted in Blogs, Enterprise 2.0, Facebook, Social Computing, Twitter, Web 2.0 | 1 Comment

Key sources of competitive advantage for your school.

This blog is 7 of 19 in a series on how to implement an Enterprise 2.0 framework for schools.

1. INTRODUCTION

The following blog briefly describes how a school can utilise social media tools to their advantage, but more importantly this blog describes how an Enterprise 2.0 model of operation can help the school achieve their organisational outcomes, and remain competitive.

The blog is a short blog and contains links to external sites, and brief descriptions to other blogs in this series. Much of this information has already been recorded in this blog series. I will, therefore, just reference this information rather than repeat it.

2.0 COMPETITVE BUSINESS DRIVERS

2.1 Student Engagement

First and foremost the most important business driver of a school is a student’s engagement with, and learning of the curriculum. In a previous blog on Return on Engagement I provided a Case Study where a Social Media was part of a larger strategy that lead to an 800% increase in engagement with the curriculum.

2.2 Teacher Engagement

There has been a lot written about the need for teachers to establish their own Professional Learning Networks through the use of Social Media. I discuss the value of this in a previous blog. In my blog Barriers to Enterprise 2.0 and also discuss the dangers of not accommodating and incorporating new knowledge into the organisation.

2.3 Many others

See my blog on Application of Social Media Use in Schools for all of the different ways that Social Media can be used to make your school competitive in the market place. Mentioned within this blog includes the Social Media applications of: Increase Communication, Increased Collaboration, Organisational Branding, and Public Relations.

This concludes my short blog on key sources of competitive advantage for your school.

Posted in Blogs, Enterprise 2.0 | Leave a comment

Building a Social Media Policy for your school

This blog is 9 of 19 in a series on how to implement an Enterprise 2.0 framework for schools.

1. Introduction

The purpose of this blog is twofold. The first is to highlight the major legal risks to schools as a result of the school’s participation in, and use of Social Media. Extending the first purpose, the second purpose of this blog is to provide a framework of understanding that will help school administrators develop social media use policy.

2. Why have a social media use policy?

From an individual perspective the use of Social Media is ubiquitous. The number of bloggers worldwide now totals approximately 184 million. The number of Facebook users 700 million, and the number of Twitter users totals 75 million. Citing school specific statistics, a recent study from Monash University suggests that 94.9% of school aged children use social media. The amount of use of social media amongst teachers is less clear. If we treat teachers as no different from the general population then we know that social media is being used for personal use. Although teachers are predominantly using social media, to participate in online social networks, there are a rising number of teachers who use social media to formalise their Personal Learning Networks (PLN). The use of social media in the classroom, although sporadic, is also on the rise with individual teachers taking the initiative to leverage social media. Currently Social Media use in your school, is most likely to be the predominant activity conducted daily by both staff and students, for both social and professional related purposes. These activities may be internal or external to your school.

If this sounds like your school, then there are already a number of legal considerations that need to be addressed through policy.  A well designed social media policy is important to control the activities of staff and students using social media sites, regardless of whether they are acting on these sites internally or externally to the school.

3. What is a social media use policy?

A policy on social media use is a document that supplements an employment contract, and is enforceable by the school on its staff. “The aim of a Social Networking Policy is to clearly communicate to the school staff what is acceptable conduct on Social Networking Sites by all employees and contractors of the schools; what conduct is unacceptable and would make and employee liable to dismissal.”

4. What is the current landscape for Social Networking policy?

Of the 49.12% of Australian organisations that have a social networking strategy, only 73% have an active social media policy.  Of the 76.79% of people surveyed, who used social networking sites at work, only 5.08% stated that their employee had amended their work contract to cater for new social media use (Source Roston Carlyle ).

5. Tips for drafting a social media policy in your school

The following considerations should be taken into account when developing a social media policy for your school.

• What is your schools current online and social media environment? What are your future plans for social media use?  Who will be using social media and in what capacity? Do you have web filtering devices that can track social media use by stakeholders in your organization?
• The subsequent social media risk matrix posed by the Social Media Strategy;
• Any industry specific risks posed to the school e.g. teachers and student relationships.

6. Is a Social Media Policy binding on school staff?

The general rule is that an employer cannot regulate the out of hour’s conduct of its staff. However, if the conduct in question is related to the school, then a case may be made that it can. A social media policy, therefore, can be binding on school’s staff provided that all reasonable attempts have been made to bring the Social Media Policy to their attention. The effectiveness of social media policy, therefore, is closely tied to how well all school stakeholders are educated on their legal risks of participation.

7. Considerations for developing Social Media Policy.

There are two major considerations to social media policy development; the first is that social media use requires the creation of content. Implications of this include: classification, ownership, intellectual property and the sustainability of this interactive business model. The second consideration is that online interactive media requires interaction. This raises issues such as governance, risk, consumer protection, and privacy.

Sal Humphreys offers six discourses for social media policy development.

1. Social Media is text, and therefore should follow the traditional methods of policy such as intellectual property, classification and free speech.
2. Social Networking sites are communities therefore corporations, associations, families, or even national laws may apply.
3. Social Network sites contain data and therefore have issues such as “privacy and data protection, surveillance and the aggregation of data”.
4. Social Network sites contain economic and social value. Who therefore owns the innovation?
5. If users are co-creators then should industrial relation laws apply?
6. Social Networking sites are a form of global media and therefore have cross-jurisdictional challenges.

The following considerations, at least, are needed in developing your social media policy: loss and disclosure from confidential information, Tweeting, tagging and status updates, wrongful dismissal, trade mark infringements, misleading and deceptive conduct, discrimination, the organisation’s liability for employee acts of defamation, and reputation risk. School specific considerations as stated by the Queensland College of Teachers will also need to be considered. If you would like to view legal precedents in social media try the following site.

7. What content should your policy address, contain or state?

The following content should be included in your social media policy.

•  Content that addresses those considerations mentioned in Section 6.
• It should highlight that school stakeholders should be limited in the use of Social Media Sites that are not being used as part of staff and students normal learning and / or role;
• Staff should be notified that all Social Media use by staff and students will be monitored whilst at school;
• Staff, students, and contractors who participate in Social Media Sites as part of their role will need to sign a Computer acceptance use, which contains Social Media considerations;
• The Social Media Policy  should provide guidance on acceptable and unacceptable behaviour and bind school stakeholders both during and after work hours;
• School stakeholders should not to bypass various technological measure to protect against viral and malware threats;
• The professional character of a teacher must be maintained at all times, if social media use includes interaction with students, either internally or externally to the school.

8. School activities that should be conducted to support the Social Media use Policy.

The following activities should be conducted to support social media use in your school.

• engaging a social media reputation monitoring service;
• training employees in how to engage effectively in Social Networking Sites and know when to escalate issues to their legal advisers;
• having a system in place to respond to complaints on forums, sites and fan pages; and
• having a documented effective social media strategy in place; and
• having a Containment Plan to deal with a social media crisis.

Example of a Social Media Policy

The major legal risks to your school, due to social media use, have been highlighted in this blog. In this blog I have provided you with the minimum content that should be included as part of any social media policy. Please note that I do not practice in law, and that it is a good idea to consult a legal professional to ensure the effectiveness of your policy.

Posted in Enterprise 2.0 | 2 Comments

Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0

A brief explanation of the difference between Web 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0

 

Yovonne Wang brought this YouTube video to my attention.

http://yifanwang2011.wordpress.com/

Posted in Facebook, Social Computing, Twitter, Web 2.0 | Leave a comment

Six discourses for Social Media policy development

There are two major challenges to social media policy development;

1. The first is that social media use requires the creation of content. Implications of this include: classification of this material, ownership and intellectual property of the content and the sustainability of interactive business models.

2. The second challenge is that online interactive media requires interaction. This raises issues such as governance of sites, risk, consumer protection, and privacy.

Sal Humphreys offers six discourses for social media policy development.

  1. Social Media is text, and therefore should follow the traditional methods of policy
    such as intellectual property, classification and free speech.
  2. Social Networking sites are communities therefore corporations, associations,
    families, or even national laws may apply.
  3. Social Network sites contain data and therefore have issues such as “privacy and data protection, surveillance and the aggregation of data”.
  4. Social Network sites contain economic and social value. Who owns the innovation?
  5. If users are co-creators then should industrial relation laws apply?
  6. Social Networking sites are a form of global media therefore cross-jurisdictional
    challenges to policy development.
Posted in Enterprise 2.0 | Leave a comment